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Swift UV light curves of recent M 31 novae

ATel #4757; F. Hofmann, W. Pietsch, J. Greiner (Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, MPE)
on 23 Jan 2013; 14:51 UT
Credential Certification: Wolfgang Pietsch (wnp@mpe.mpg.de)

Subjects: Ultra-Violet, Nova

Referred to by ATel #: 4988, 6564

In monitoring observations of the central region of the Andromeda Galaxy with the Ultra-violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift satellite from 2012-07-19.09 to 2013-01-19.33 UT, we extend UV light curves (UVW1 filter, 181-321nm) for five novae (see ATel #4281) and report UV detections for five recently discovered novae. The following tables show magnitudes (Vega system) and 1&sigma statistical uncertainties. Nova name and first detection of the outburst in the optical (in Modified Julian Date MJD) are indicated at the top of each column (see M 31 (apparent) optical nova catalogue and references therein). We identify the observation by the last two digits of the identification number (00035336000 + ID) and MJD at the start. 3&sigma upper limits ('>') are only given for observations adjacent to a nova detection. The '*' indicates that the nova was out of the field of view.

 
ID MJD       2012-03b   2012-05a   2012-05b   2012-06a   2012-06g 
             (56002.8)  (56051.8)  (56052.1)  (56096.1)  (56104.8) 
62 56135.77  19.6±0.2   19.2±0.2              19.4±0.2   > 20.03 
63 56144.13  19.9±0.3   19.0±0.2              19.6±0.3   19.6±0.4 
64 56151.48  19.7±0.4   19.1±0.3   > 19.3     19.6±0.5   > 19.5 
65 56159.90  20.3±0.4   18.8±0.2   19.2±0.3   * 
66 56167.58  > 20.2     19.4±0.4   > 19.3     19.4±0.3 
67 56171.58  > 20.4     > 19.9                19.6±0.2 
68 56175.54  > 20.4                           > 20.0 
69 56183.16  20.4±0.4 
70 56191.49  > 20.6 
71 56199.52  > 20.2 
72 56207.65  19.8±0.3 
73 56247.61  > 20.6 

M31N 2012-03b shows a long activity phase until 2012-11-16 UT. M31N 2012-05a and 2012-05b have been visible for about four months. M31N 2012-06a and 2012-06g were detected for 68 and 40 d, respectively. Since ATel #4281, we detected five more recent M 31 novae with Swift UVOT:
 
ID MJD       2012-07b   2012-09a   2012-09b   2012-12a   2013-01a 
             (56124.0)  (56178.8)  (56187.8)  (56271.0)  (56296.5) 
61 56127.09  > 20.4 
62 56135.77  19.2±0.2 
63 56144.13  17.7±0.1 
64 56151.48  17.7±0.1 
65 56159.90  17.7±0.1 
66 56167.58  18.2±0.1 
67 56171.58  18.8±0.1 
68 56175.54  18.5±0.1   > 19.0 
69 56183.16  19.5±0.2   18.6±0.3   > 20.0 
70 56191.49  > 20.4     19.0±0.4   17.4±0.1 
71 56199.52             > 18.9     18.7±0.2 
72 56207.65                        > 19.9 
83 56287.29                                   > 19.5 
84 56291.36                                   19.3±0.4 
85 56295.36                                   19.4±0.5   > 19.6 
86 56299.37                                   19.5±0.5   18.1±0.1 
87 56303.05                                   > 19.5     18.0±0.1 
88 56307.05                                              17.5±0.1 
89 56311.33                                              17.6±0.1 

M31N 2012-07b is visible for about 48 days. M31N 2012-09a, 2012-09b and 2012-12a are only detected for about eight days each.
All magnitudes are on the UVOT photometric system (Poole et al. 2008, MNRAS, 383, 627) and have not been corrected for extinction. We would like to thank the Swift Team for making these observations possible, in particular N. Gehrels, the duty scientists as well as the science planners.